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Video: Deshaun Watson Appears to Have Been Asked to Leave an Alabama Bar Because Football

Three things are sacred in the South: food, football, and manners. And one of them certainly went out the window.

Liam Daniel Pierce

I don't know if you've ever been on Bourbon Street around noon, midsummer at the dueling piano bar Pat O'Brien's while Clemson and Alabama fans scream chants dead-eyed, tirelessly back and forth at each other in a perfume of rum/hurricane exhaust that drowns out the only duel people came to see: that of pianos.... But I can assure you, it's annoying as hell.

The South's relationship with college ball can be magical, generous, and family-oriented—have you ever been to an LSU crawfish boil? Or it can be tribalistic, violent, and noxious. Such is the way with most sports, sure, but the South's special blend of football herbs and spices can make for a particularly charged atmosphere. Take, for example when a grown human being appeared to ask a football player to leave a bar they were both in because that grown human being didn't like that the football player played well against the grown human being's own team. Ayyyyyyup.

It's hard to confirm exactly what went down—or even if this is some elaborate April Fool's joke (today is a nightmare for all journalists)—but according to the video above, it appears that former Clemson quarterback Deshaun Watson was asked to leave a bar in Tuscaloosa because Clemson beat Alabama. Some reports are claiming that former Alabama players Wallace Gillberry (last played in 2007) Ryan Anderson (who recovered a couple of fumbles in this year's National Championship) were the prime instigators. Here's a video of what appears to be them talking down to Watson, asking him to leave:

In either event, maybe Watson was toe-ing the line by going to a bar close to the University of Alabama—the bar later issued a statement on their Facebook page, apologizing for their customers' behavior—but Watson was just trying to get some food with his girlfriend. Three things are sacred in the South: food, football, and manners. And one of them certainly went out the window.