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Not Even The Brightness of the Sun Can Stop Bryce Harper From Catching Baseballs

Screw you, sun. You ain't got nothing on Bryce Harper.

Liam Daniel Pierce

The sun is a 1.989 x 1030 kg star that generates 3.9 x 1026 watts, which roughly calculates to a cosmic shit-ton of lightbulbs. You can permanently damage your retina by staring at it for 100 seconds. You've probably heard of it. It's hella bright.

But! The sun is not bright enough to stop Bryce Harper from catching baseballs. In Thursday's game against the Marlins, an eventual 4-3 L for Washington, the Nationals' All-Star right fielder was eying a sinking liner when he crossed paths with the thing that allows for human life, the great flaming orb we love to know, the celestial body we were just talking about in the previous paragraph. Instead of continuing to damage his moneymakers, Harper decided he knew enough about trajectories to know exactly where the ball was going to end up. He stuck out his glove, splayed out with a dive, and then marveled at the miniature, white, flameless star in his possession. Screw you, sun. You've got nothing on Bryce Harper.