Quantcast
Baseball

Foul Tip Cracks Marlins Home Plate Fish Tank, Which Exists Because Why?

It's as if Tony Montana designed Marlins Park.

Liam Daniel Pierce

Last night, an errant foul tip found its way to the space behind home plate at Miami's Marlins Park, which is where baseballs tend to go. Normally, this wouldn't be a problem, as most fields have walls or ads or pads up to prevent any damage to materials or human life. But since Marlins Park is apparently a drug dealer's vacation home, there's a giant fish tank there. The fish tank broke upon impact because of course it did. It's a fish tank.

It was Miami's catcher J.T. Realmuto who rocketed the ball at the tank with a low swing. Just take a look:

Then super-advanced marine biologists/engineers a man with duct tape came in and repaired it:

The fish tank behind home plate—aka a piping-hot, sun-exposed fish prison that no one but five people really get to look at—had some polycarbonate on it, but it wasn't strong enough to prevent water from spilling out of a crack on the second layer, according to MLB.com. The Marlins claim that the fish are OK, but what the fuck?

"Let's put a breakable, half-assed home for living creatures behind a place where hard objects fly at upwards of 100mph" seems like a gold idea. Only a sport as gimmicky as baseball could come up with such assclownery.